Narrowed Topic: the specific topic you're writing about

…attempt to make others look bad (i.e. Mr. Smith is ignorant—don’t listen to him!)

Focus: the aspect/area within your topic that you want to discuss

1.) Write a narrative account of a time you enjoyed a “moment of glory” completing high school or your GED, getting your driver’s license, or participating in a sports- or competition-related event. Explain what happened, how you reacted, and why you reacted the way that you did. Be sure to explain both the immediate and the long-term significance of this event, and use specific, detailed descriptions.

Narrowed Topic: English in the USA and English in India

Your essay will be evaluated in terms of Main Idea, Organization, Support, and Mechanics (Words and Sentences). Therefore, make certain your essay is not only well organized and developed, but also grammatically correct, free of errors in mechanics, grammar, usage, and spelling.

Essays must have an appropriate, original title; contain an introduction (with an explicit, assertive thesis, underlined), several body paragraphs supporting the thesis, and an appropriate concluding paragraph; and avoid use of you throughout. Be sure to use appropriate topic sentences and transitions to guide the reader.


Developing a Thesis Statement and Supporting Ideas

Note: All readings below are required, and must be completed by the session indicated; the only exceptions are those indicated with an asterisk (*), which are recommended additional readings or resources.

A thesis statement, for example, might read:

Note: As a general rule, extra credit only helps if you have already completed all of the assigned work, and will not make up for missing an essay (or two, or three). Extra credit opportunities will be, so do not ask at the end of the semester for extra credit to bring your average up.

You may encounter a thesis statement that reads:

(10% total):
Students will also complete various shorter in-class writing assignments during the semester, including short summaries, mini-essays, and response papers. Total number of assignments during the semester will determine the point value of each; that is, if 10 assignments are required, each is worth up to one full point.

In what ways are the lifestyles of the youngsters different?

Diagnostic Essay (ungraded):
Students will complete an in-class at the beginning of the semester on a topic provided; this essay will be read and returned, but will not receive a grade, nor will it affect your final average. Students should retain this and all other essays until the end of the semester.

You can develop a thesis statement by answering three questions:

Additional Assistance:
Students should avail themselves of the Writing Center and Help Centers available in the English and Reading/BEP departments, located at Bradley and North Halls and the Library, as part of this course. These services can be considered an integral part of the course work and will help the student to master the necessary knowledge and skills for Composition I.

(This version at least says why the difference exists)

Essays submitted by email will not be accepted, and late work will be penalized 10% for each day it is late; see . All at-home work must be typed (in 12-point Times New Roman), double-spaced, with one-inch margins, andstapled when submitted. In-class work must be neatly printed in blue or black ink on loose-leaf composition paper or in bluebooks provided by the instructor and double-spaced§. All essays must also include a proper heading (see), including Word Count; have anshould be grammatically correct, free of errors in mechanics, grammar, usage, spelling, and documentation, and will be evaluated according to the . Please refer to the or and for additional assistance.