Areas of the oral pharynx, tonsils and salivary glands were excluded.

Findings from the study indicated a low level of awareness of oral cancer among the student.

Since then, numerous other reports have verified this association.


A study conducted in an area of Italy where residential radon levels are high confirms that the risk of lung cancer increases in step with levels of radon exposure, but that the Mediterranean diet may modify the effects.

Hence, public health education aimed at increasing the awareness of the disease is recommended.

Journal of the American Dietetic Association, April 2009.

Tada T, Shin M, Fukushima H, Okabe K,Ozeki S, Okamoto M and Jimi E: Oral squamous cell carcinoma cellsmodulate osteoclast function by RANKL-dependent and -independentmechanisms. Cancer Lett. 274:126–131. 2009. : :

The median actual survival was 40% longer than the median predicted survival.

Among 3,600 Canadian men ages 35 to 70, those who averaged at least a drink per day had higher risks of a number of cancers than men who drank occasionally or not at all -- including cancers of the esophagus, stomach, colon, lungs, pancreas, liver and prostate.

The practical significance of this finding in humans is not clear at this time.


Thesis on oral cancer and bangladesh by Roushan …

After Dr. Beard's death in 1923, the enzyme therapy was largely forgotten. Periodically, other practitioners have rediscovered Dr. Beard's work, and used pancreatic proteolytic enzymes as an alternative cancer treatment. (8)

CDC Oral Cancer Background Papers - The Oral Cancer Foundation

Dr. Beard believed the enzymes had to be injected, to prevent destruction by hydrochloric acid in the stomach. However, recent evidence demonstrates that orally ingested pancreatic proteolytic enzymes are acid-stable (9), pass intact into the small intestine, and are absorbed through the intestinal mucosa into the blood stream as part of an enteropancreatic recycling process. (10,11)

Cancer Topics - International Agency for Research on Cancer

My research advisor at Cornell, Dr. Robert A. Good, at the time President of Sloan-Kettering, agreed to support a case review of Kelley's patients, which I continued despite the rigors of third year medical school. During my fourth year at Cornell, I was given a considerable block of time under Dr. Good's direction to investigate Kelley's work and results in a more structured manner. Eventually, what began as a student project developed into a two-year formal research effort which I pursued during my formal immunology training.

thesis topics on oral cancer - YouTube

The purpose of this essay is to report on the initial reception and efficacy of an educational brochure that details both the importance of screening for oral cancer and how readers should perform self-examinations. This highly treatable disease often goes unnoticed until later stages of the disease at which point the survival rate of the disease drops considerably. Screenings that would detect the disease in the early stages are common practice in many current dental offices and consequentially people who visit the dentist biannually are more likely to have the disease detected early. Unfortunately a large portion of the general public does not regularly visit the general dentist. These individuals often lack the knowledge of the importance of oral cancer screenings and are generally unaware of current oral cancer screening methods. While other brochures regarding oral cancer exist, they are not addressed to the general public and none give a visual walkthrough on how to perform an oral cancer screening. The purpose of this study was to develop a simple self-exam brochure to screen for oral cancer and determine brochure usability with patients. Methods and Materials: 50 new patients (18 male, 32 female) seen in the Department of Periodontics at the University of Pittsburgh were given the self-exam brochure and asked to answer a 14 question survey regarding the readability of the brochure and usefulness of the pictures in the brochure. Results: 78% of patients contended that the brochure was useful for self-screening, while 98% of patients acknowledged that the brochure increased their personal knowledge of oral cancer. Ultimately 100% of patients surveyed said they would recommend the brochure to others. Conclusion: Due to the positive reviews of the brochure it is recommended that a final copy of the brochure be published to increase awareness of oral cancer and allow for individuals of the population to conduct self-screening exams on their own. Fabrication of this brochure has a public health significance of fostering oral cancer awareness in the community and also providing a means for those who cannot afford regular dental care to screen themselves for oral cancer.

Molecular changes involved in oral cancer progression …

The purpose of this essay is to report on the initial reception and efficacy of an educational brochure that details both the importance of screening for oral cancer and how readers should perform self-examinations. This highly treatable disease often goes unnoticed until later stages of the disease at which point the survival rate of the disease drops considerably. Screenings that would detect the disease in the early stages are common practice in many current dental offices and consequentially people who visit the dentist biannually are more likely to have the disease detected early. Unfortunately a large portion of the general public does not regularly visit the general dentist. These individuals often lack the knowledge of the importance of oral cancer screenings and are generally unaware of current oral cancer screening methods. While other brochures regarding oral cancer exist, they are not addressed to the general public and none give a visual walkthrough on how to perform an oral cancer screening. The purpose of this study was to develop a simple self-exam brochure to screen for oral cancer and determine brochure usability with patients. Methods and Materials: 50 new patients (18 male, 32 female) seen in the Department of Periodontics at the University of Pittsburgh were given the self-exam brochure and asked to answer a 14 question survey regarding the readability of the brochure and usefulness of the pictures in the brochure. Results: 78% of patients contended that the brochure was useful for self-screening, while 98% of patients acknowledged that the brochure increased their personal knowledge of oral cancer. Ultimately 100% of patients surveyed said they would recommend the brochure to others. Conclusion: Due to the positive reviews of the brochure it is recommended that a final copy of the brochure be published to increase awareness of oral cancer and allow for individuals of the population to conduct self-screening exams on their own. Fabrication of this brochure has a public health significance of fostering oral cancer awareness in the community and also providing a means for those who cannot afford regular dental care to screen themselves for oral cancer.