Two-hit hypothesis explanation free

Looking for online definition of Two-hit hypothesis in the Medical Dictionary

The 'Two-Hit' Hypothesis in Abnormal Psychology | …

AB - To account for the complex genetics, the developmental biology, and the late adolescent/early adulthood onset of schizophrenia, the "two-hit" hypothesis has gained increasing attention. In this model, genetic or environmental factors disrupt early central nervous system (CNS) development. These early disruptions produce long-term vulnerability to a "second hit" that then leads to the onset of schizophrenia symptoms. The cell-cell signaling pathways involved in nonaxial induction, morphogenesis, and differentiation in the brain, as well as in the limbs and face, could be targets for a "first hit" during early development. These same pathways, redeployed for neuronal maintenance rather than morphogenesis, may be targets for a "second hit" in the adolescent or adult brain. Furthermore, dysregulation of cell-cell signaling by a "first hit" may prime the CNS for a pathologic response to a "second hit" via the same signaling pathway. Thus, parallel disruption of cell-cell signaling in both the developing and the mature CNS provides a plausible way of integrating genetic, developmental, and environmental factors that contribute to vulnerability and pathogenesis in schizophrenia.

Wiki Group 51 Two Hit Hypothesis 2 - YouTube

Hereditary cancer: Two hits revisited | SpringerLink

N2 - To account for the complex genetics, the developmental biology, and the late adolescent/early adulthood onset of schizophrenia, the "two-hit" hypothesis has gained increasing attention. In this model, genetic or environmental factors disrupt early central nervous system (CNS) development. These early disruptions produce long-term vulnerability to a "second hit" that then leads to the onset of schizophrenia symptoms. The cell-cell signaling pathways involved in nonaxial induction, morphogenesis, and differentiation in the brain, as well as in the limbs and face, could be targets for a "first hit" during early development. These same pathways, redeployed for neuronal maintenance rather than morphogenesis, may be targets for a "second hit" in the adolescent or adult brain. Furthermore, dysregulation of cell-cell signaling by a "first hit" may prime the CNS for a pathologic response to a "second hit" via the same signaling pathway. Thus, parallel disruption of cell-cell signaling in both the developing and the mature CNS provides a plausible way of integrating genetic, developmental, and environmental factors that contribute to vulnerability and pathogenesis in schizophrenia.

To account for the complex genetics, the developmental biology, and the late adolescent/early adulthood onset of schizophrenia, the "two-hit" hypothesis has gained increasing attention. In this model, genetic or environmental factors disrupt early central nervous system (CNS) development. These early disruptions produce long-term vulnerability to a "second hit" that then leads to the onset of schizophrenia symptoms. The cell-cell signaling pathways involved in nonaxial induction, morphogenesis, and differentiation in the brain, as well as in the limbs and face, could be targets for a "first hit" during early development. These same pathways, redeployed for neuronal maintenance rather than morphogenesis, may be targets for a "second hit" in the adolescent or adult brain. Furthermore, dysregulation of cell-cell signaling by a "first hit" may prime the CNS for a pathologic response to a "second hit" via the same signaling pathway. Thus, parallel disruption of cell-cell signaling in both the developing and the mature CNS provides a plausible way of integrating genetic, developmental, and environmental factors that contribute to vulnerability and pathogenesis in schizophrenia.