The Blom-Singer Indwelling voice prosthesis is an ..

Tracheoesophageal voice prosthesis (TEP) - Laryngopedia

Tracheostomy stoma prostheses - Medicine - Surgical …

Dr. Eric D. Blom, PhD, of Head and Neck Surgery Associates in Indianapolis, IN, had a Letter to the Editor published in Otolaryngology - Head & Neck Surgery on the above subject. The original letter from Volume 129 April 2003 is in the archives of the Journal of American Medical Association. An Adobe Acrobat (.pdf) format is available for those who would care to read it in its entirety (to include its charts). Dr. Blom notes in his conclusion, based upon numerous independent clinical observations, that, "Although it is not irrefutably established that leakage around a tracheoesophageal voice prosthesis is predictably related to increased dimensional characteristics or the dilating effects of insertion, an awareness of a possible relationship seems warranted." One of the studies cited by Dr. Blom in his letter was "Downsizing of Voice Prosthesis Diameter in Patients with Laryngectomy", by Drs. Eerenstein, Grolman, & Schouwenburg, 2002. An Adobe Acrobat (.pdf) format copy of an is also available, should you be interested in reading it.

Clínica dental Stoma | IMPLANTED PROSTHESIS

Tracheoesophageal Voice Prosthesis (TEP) - Practical …

N2 - Objectives/Hypothesis: Vocal rehabilitation of patients who have undergone laryngectomy is best accomplished by a tracheoesophageal puncture. Optimal function of the prosthesis requires an adequate stoma. Patients with tracheostomal stenosis require revision of the stoma if vocal rehabilitation is to take place. Revision and tracheoesophageal placement are usually done as two separate procedures. Creating a tracheoesophageal fistula at the time of stomal revision has not been addressed in the literature. Study Design: Prospective analysis and follow-up of 10 patients undergoing simultaneous tracheoesophageal puncture and stomal revision for tracheostomal stenosis between 1991 and 1996. Methods: Ten patients were reviewed. An inferiorly based V-Y advancement flap was used so as not to interfere with the tracheoesophageal puncture. All patients had received radiation prior to revision and tracheoesophageal puncture. Patients were followed for a minimum of 2 years (range, 2-6 y; median, 3 y). Results: All patients maintained an adequate stoma without stenting. Eight of ten patients (80%) developed and maintained good tracheoesophageal speech. Two patients had their speech fistulas removed. There were no intraoperative or postoperative complications. Conclusions: Creation of a tracheoesophageal fistula at the time of stomal revision allows for vocal rehabilitation with a single visit to the operating room.

This will immediately generate intense coughing that may expel the prosthesis though the stoma.

Analogous to developments in dental implantology, there are also initiatives for femoral and tibial osseointegration systems to be implemented via one operation (single-stage method) [, ]. This approach, of course, has an important advantage in that there is only one surgery needed, instead of two, with a reduction of treatment time. In certain (tibia) cases, the soft tissue covering the stump is so thin that treatment in two stages is technically not possible. In those cases, the placement of the transcutaneous component, usually occurring in stage two, is performed in the first operation. The original idea for performing the OIP placement in two stages is to allow bony ingrowth of the femoral stem under sterile conditions. Adequate osseointegration of the implant prevents any infection from ascending from the stoma and entering the marrow cavity. In the case of single-stage procedures, the transcutaneous component of the OIP system is theoretically under nonsterile conditions during the osseointegration period, with a consequently possibly higher risk of osteomyelitis and septic loosening. To date, standard OIP treatment is carried out in two stages at our clinic. Further research will indicate whether single-stage OIP treatment is safe enough to offer as standard procedure.

Tracheo Stoma Vent Voice Prosthesis - ResearchGate


T-SToMA – The only viable alternative

A TEP (tracheoesophageal puncture) is a same-day, simple, surgery, where the doctor makes a small puncture in the wall between the trachea and esophagus. This puncture will hold a prosthesis, with a valve on the esophageal end, so that lung air can again be directed through the mouth by closing off the stoma during exhalation. Closing the stoma can be done with finger, thumb or hands free valve (see illustration above). This redirected column of air will pick up vibrations as it passes through a narrowed section of the esophagus, so talking is again possible for most people.

Atos Medical may also share your personal ..

Objectives/Hypothesis: Vocal rehabilitation of patients who have undergone laryngectomy is best accomplished by a tracheoesophageal puncture. Optimal function of the prosthesis requires an adequate stoma. Patients with tracheostomal stenosis require revision of the stoma if vocal rehabilitation is to take place. Revision and tracheoesophageal placement are usually done as two separate procedures. Creating a tracheoesophageal fistula at the time of stomal revision has not been addressed in the literature. Study Design: Prospective analysis and follow-up of 10 patients undergoing simultaneous tracheoesophageal puncture and stomal revision for tracheostomal stenosis between 1991 and 1996. Methods: Ten patients were reviewed. An inferiorly based V-Y advancement flap was used so as not to interfere with the tracheoesophageal puncture. All patients had received radiation prior to revision and tracheoesophageal puncture. Patients were followed for a minimum of 2 years (range, 2-6 y; median, 3 y). Results: All patients maintained an adequate stoma without stenting. Eight of ten patients (80%) developed and maintained good tracheoesophageal speech. Two patients had their speech fistulas removed. There were no intraoperative or postoperative complications. Conclusions: Creation of a tracheoesophageal fistula at the time of stomal revision allows for vocal rehabilitation with a single visit to the operating room.