ATP can easily release and store energy by breaking and ..

What is the relationship between photosynthesis and cellular respiration

Brief explain the relationship between photosynthesis …

Few people on Earth today have much understanding of the relationship between . Most people think that money runs the world, when it is only an accounting fiction. Money by itself is meaningless, and financial measures of economic activity can be highly misleading. I noted long ago that scientists had little respect for . that obscured the role of energy while exalting money. What a coincidence. Understanding this essay's first half will help with comprehending the last half, and the connections between energy, ecosystems, and economics should become clear.

What is the difference between photosynthesis and respiration?

But the branch of the that readers might find most interesting led to humans. Humans are in the phylum, and the last common ancestor that founded the Chordata phylum is still a mystery and understandably a source of controversy. Was our ancestor a ? A ? Peter Ward made the case, as have others for a long time, that it was the sea squirt, also called a tunicate, which in its larval stage resembles a fish. The nerve cord in most bilaterally symmetric animals runs below the belly, not above it, and a sea squirt that never grew up may have been our direct ancestor. Adult tunicates are also highly adapted to extracting oxygen from water, even too much so, with only about 10% of today’s available oxygen extracted in tunicate respiration. It may mean that tunicates adapted to low oxygen conditions early on. Ward’s respiration hypothesis, which makes the case that adapting to low oxygen conditions was an evolutionary spur for animals, will repeatedly reappear in this essay, as will . Ward’s hypothesis may be proven wrong or will not have the key influence that he attributes to it, but it also has plenty going for it. The idea that fluctuating oxygen levels impacted animal evolution has been gaining support in recent years, particularly in light of recent reconstructions of oxygen levels in the eon of complex life, called and , which have yielded broadly similar results, but their variances mean that much more work needs to be performed before on the can be done, if it ever can be. Ward’s basic hypotheses is that when oxygen levels are high, ecosystems are diverse and life is an easy proposition; when oxygen levels are low, animals adapted to high oxygen levels go extinct and the survivors are adapted to low oxygen with body plan changes, and their adaptations helped them dominate after the extinctions. The has a pretty wide range of potential error, particularly in the early years, and it also tracked atmospheric carbon dioxide levels. The challenges to the validity of a model based on data with such a wide range of error are understandable. But some broad trends are unmistakable, as it is with other models, some of which are generally declining carbon dioxide levels, some huge oxygen spikes, and the generally relationship between oxygen and carbon dioxide levels, which a geochemist would expect. The high carbon dioxide level during the Cambrian, of at least 4,000 PPM (the "RCO2" in the below graphic is a ratio of the calculated CO2 levels to today's levels), is what scientists think made the times so hot. (Permission: Peter Ward, June 2014)

Since the most dramatic instances of speciation seem to have happened in the aftermath of mass extinctions, this essay will survey extinction first. A corollary to is that if any critical nutrient falls low enough, the nutrient deficiency will not only limit growth, but the organism will be stressed. If the nutrient level falls far enough, the organism will die. A human can generally survive between one and two months without food, ten days without water, and about three minutes without oxygen. For nearly all animals, all the food and water in the world are meaningless without oxygen. Some microbes can switch between aerobic respiration and fermentation, depending on the environment (which might be a very old talent), but complex life generally does not have that ability; nearly all aerobic complex life is oxygen dependent. The only exceptions are marine life which has adapted to . Birds can go where mammals cannot, , for instance, or being , due to their . If oxygen levels rise or fall very fast, many organisms will not be able to adapt, and will die.


What's the difference between Cellular Respiration and ..

Photosynthesis is an enzymatic processes and therefore quite sensitive to temperature (). Maximum photosynthetic rates are realized over a fairly small range of temperatures. The optimum temperature varies by species () and environment (), with many temperate species having optimal temperatures near 16°C, and many tropical species having temperature optima closer to 38°C. In natural systems temperature and light are often related and can be difficult to separate. At high light intensities photosynthesis is much more sensitive to temperature than at low light intensities, since at low light intensities the overall rate of photosynthesis is limited by energy capture (). At moderate to high light levels photosynthetic rates can increase 2 to 5x for each 10 rise in temperature. Respiration is also quite sensitive to temperature and in this case generally continues to increase in proportion to the temperature, doubling with each 10 degree increase in temperature (). However, given plenty of water, both respiration and photosynthesis occur at faster rates for tropical ecosystems than in colder climates.

Cellular Respiration versus Photosynthesis comparison ..

2 Through the two sections of photosynthesis there is
a total biproduct of 1 glucose molecule and 6 oxygen
molecules Purpose The purpose of this prezi is to illustrate the relationship
between the photosynthetic proscess and its products
and the cellular respiration proscess and how the two
relate to each other.