Formerly known as: Political Economy of Industrial Societies 24

All students who declare Political Economy must meet the eligibility requirements listed below:

Formerly known as: Political Economy of Industrial Societies 84

Tonya Kenny is from Baton Rouge, Louisiana. Her research interests primarily focus on electoral institutions, democratic consolidation, state repression, political survival, clientelism, and election fraud. Her interests mainly pertain to the region of sub-saharan Africa, but she has conducted several cross-national analyses and case studies outside the region as well. Her current research seeks to understand the electoral consequences of repressive behavior from the state as well as the influence of clientelism on electoral outcomes and democratic consolidation, with a particular focus on the region of sub-saharan Africa. Additionally, she is currently working on a project that investigates the cross-national determinants of election fraud using new measurements and multiple regression analysis.

The course list for the Political Economy minor is available on the .

Graduation with Honors. No more than 16 percent of the graduating seniors, who have completed at least 72 units in the University of California will receive honors: approximately 2 percent summa cum laude, 4 percent magna cum laude, and 10 percent cum laude. The student’s cumulative record at the end of the final quarter is the basis for consideration for awarding Latin Honors. To be eligible for consideration for honors at graduation, the student must, before the end of winter quarter of the senior year, have submitted an Application for Graduation; be officially declared as a major within the School of Social Sciences; have all corrections to the academic record processed by the Registrar’s Office; if completing the Language Other Than English general education requirement with a language exemption test, pass the test by the end of winter quarter; and be able to verify completion of all course work by the end of the spring quarter of the senior year. Other factors are listed in the .


Course objective: This course has two objectives: (1) To develop students' skills in research and writing. Specifically, participants will work on: formulating a research question, placing it in the context of an existing literature and/or policy area, and using economic and econometric tools to address it in writing. Specifically, in the first part of the class, readings, problem sets, and a midterm exam will build skills in these areas. In the second part, students will come up with a research question, and address it in a research proposal/report. While all the applications will be on the economics of education, these skills will be useful in students' subsequent careers,regardless of the area of economics they focus on. (2) To provide an introduction to key issues in the economics of education. Specifically, education is a signicant industryevery person entering this course will have already spent years in this industry as a customer, as a worker, as an input, or all of the above. The course will address questions like: What does economics have to say about how this industry is organized and what determines its output? Why do individuals invest in education? What determines the behavior, productivity, and reputation of rms in the industry? What role should government and public policy (if any) play in its operation?


Prerequisites: Political Economy 100, N100 or consent of instructor

Acquaints students with the fundamental patterns of the global economy. Emphasizes the historical roots and political implications of economic choices.

Formerly known as: Political Economy of Industrial Societies 24

Introduction to game theory and a survey of its political applications. Examples of topics covered include voting in small committees, legislatures, and mass elections; interest group activities and environmental issues; institutional design, and the evolution of cooperative behavior.

Formerly known as: Political Economy of Industrial Societies 130

Acquaints students with the fundamental patterns of the global economy. Emphasizes the historical roots and political implications of economic choices.

Formerly known as: Political Economy of Industrial Societies 84

Offers a general overview of the rise of global interdependence in political, economic, demographic, and cultural terms. Considers what drove people from relative isolation into intensified intercourse with one another, and investigates the consequences of this shift.

Formerly known as: Political Economy of Industrial Societies 98

Surveys postwar developments in the politics and political economy of Japan. Topics include the political and institutional context of policy making; pressures for change which Japan's political economy has faced in the last decade; Japan's past and present foreign policies.

Formerly known as: Political Economy of Industrial Societies 140

Offers a general overview of the rise of global interdependence in political, economic, demographic, and cultural terms. Considers what drove people from relative isolation into intensified intercourse with one another, and investigates the consequences of this shift.