28/12/2017 · Do plants perform cellular respiration

Inside the  (a special organelle within a plant cell), a molecule of chlorophyll absorbs the light.

10/10/2016 · Do plants undergo cellular respiration

The differences in photosynthesis and respiration in germinating and non-germinating peas may help us explain the adaptations plants have made to be successful organisms. Many plants generate seeds to produce their offspring and within these seeds is the genetic information they need to become mature, reproductive plants. Since these seedlings begin without roots to acquire nutrients or leaves to generate energy, an investigation into a seedlings metabolic processes may provide insight into how a seed initially survives to maturity. Therefore, if germinating peas require energy to grow and we compare photosynthesis and respiration rates between germinating and non-germinating peas then we should see higher rates of respiration and photosynthesis in the germinating peas.

Confusion regarding photosynthesis and respiration in plants

Each experimental trial was performed at room temperature (21 - 24 degrees Celsius). This was important so that changes in photosynthesis or respiration were isolated to the peas biological processes and not due to a change in temperature. Ten non-germinating peas were weighed, then placed in a sealed bottle and the concentration of CO2 was monitored for a period of ten to twenty minutes. This time was equally divided between light and darkness and was long enough to derive an accurate slope, and consequently photosynthesis and respiration rates, from changes in CO2 concentration. Then ten germinating peas were measured, using the same procedure. A total of two runs for germinating peas and a total of two runs for non-germinating peas were completed for this experiment. The rates derived from these procedures were then divided by its groups corresponding mass. This standardized results so that quantitatively the data was equivalent among trials and not skewed by differences in mass.

The problem of photorespiration is overcome in by a two-stage strategy that keeps CO2 high and oxygen low in the chloroplast where the Calvin cycle operates. The class of plants called and the also have better strategies than C3 plants for the avoidance of photorespiration.


so do plants use cellular respiration and fermentation as well ..

Plants make their own food by photosynthesis. Carbon dioxide and water react together in the presence of light and chlorophyll to make glucose and oxygen. The glucose is converted into starch, fats and oils for storage. It is used to make cellulose for cell walls, and proteins for growth and repair. It is also used by the plant to release energy by respiration.

or as a fuel in cellular respiration

is a chemical reaction that happens in the chloroplasts of plant cells. It produces glucose for use by the plant, and oxygen as a waste product. Here are the equations for photosynthesis:

Why do plants do cellular respiration

The acidity was found to arise from the opening of their stomata at night to take in CO2 and fix it into malic acid for storage in the large vacuoles of their photosynthetic cells. It could drop the pH to 4 with a malic acid concentration up to 0.3M . Then in the heat of the day, the stomata close tightly to conserve water and the malic acid is decarboxylated to release the CO2 for fixing by the Calvin cycle. PEP is used for the initial short-term carbon fixation as in the , but the entire chain of reactions occurs in the same cell rather than handing off to a separate cell as with the C4 plants. In the CAM strategy, the processes are separated temporally, the initial CO2 fixation at night, and the malic acid to Calvin cycle part taking place during the day.

why do plants need ATP from cellular respiration? | …

It is not just animals that – plants carry out respiration as well. Plants respire all the time because their cells need energy to stay alive, but plants can only photosynthesise when they are in the light.

and Animals Respiration in Plants Plants do not need ..

Under moderate temperature conditions when C3 plants have sufficient water, the supply of carbon dioxide is abundant and photorespiration is not a problem. The CO2 concentration of the atmosphere as of 2004 was about 380 ppm and this CO2 freely diffuses through the stomata of leaves and across the membranes of the while water diffuses out through the stomata. But during hot and dry conditions, the stomata close to prevent excessive water loss and the continuing fixation of carbon in the dramatically reduces the relative concentration of CO2. When it reaches a critical level of about 50 ppm the rubisco stops fixing CO2 and begins to fix O2 instead. Even though the detoured process feeds some PGA back into the cycle, the photorespiration process causes rubisco to operate at only about 25% of its optimal rate.