#chemosynthesis vs photosynthesis venn diagram.

Now we need to understand how cells can use the products ofphotosynthesis to obtain energy.

#photosynthesis and respiration venn diagram answers.

Variables: The variables that might affect the rate of photosynthesis in this experiment are: Temperature: When the temperature rises so does the rate of photosynthesis; this is because as the temperature around the plant rises the enzymes controlling photosynthesis inside the chloroplasts heat up and start moving around faster, the fast moving molecules collide with other fast moving enzymes causing them to react....

The Process of Photosynthesis in Plants (With Diagram)

For each electron flowing from water to NADP+ (a net change in1.14 volts), two quanta of light are absorbed, one by eachPhotosystem. Each molecule of oxygen released involves the flowof four electrons from two water molecules to two NADP+s andrequires four quanta of sunlight absorbed by each Photosystem toprovide the energy to do this. These are the "Light PhaseReactions" of photosynthesis, which produce two high energychemical products, namely NADPH and ATP.

The Z Scheme diagram shows the pathway of an electron fromwater (lower right) to NADP+ (upper left). It also shows theenergy relationships which are measured as voltage potentialshown on the scaleon the right. To raise the energy of theelectrons derived from water (+0.82 volts) to the level necessaryto reduce NADP+ to NADPH (-0.32 volts), each electron must beboosted twice (vertical red arrows) by light energy absorbed inPhotosystems I and II. After each boosting , the energizedelectrons flow "downhill" (diagonal black lines) and inthe process transfer some of their energy to a series ofreactions which ultimately adds a phosporus to ADP to producehigh energy ATP and reduces NADP+ to NADPH. There is analternative shunt whereby the electron flow turns back tocytochrome b563 (green line)and this is called and it occurs when there is no need for NADPH, so onlyATP is produced.


The Three Stages of Photosynthesis | Sciencing

The light-independant reactions of photosynthesis occur in the stroma of the chloroplast and involve the conversion of carbon dioxide and other compounds into glucose. The light-independent reactions can be split into three stages, these are carbon fixation, the reduction reactions and finally the regeneration of ribulose bisphosphate. Collectively these stages are known as the Calvin Cycle.

"The Three Stages of Photosynthesis."

A limiting factor is a factor that controls a process. Light intensity, temperature and carbon dioxide concentration are all factors which can control the rate of photosynthesis. Usually, only one of these factors will be the limiting factor in a plant at a certain time. This is the factor which is the furthest from its optimum level at a particular point in time. If we change the limiting factor the rate of photosynthesis will change but changes to the other factors will have no effect on the rate. If the levels of the limiting factor increase so that this factor is no longer the furthest from its optimum level, the limiting factor will change to the factor which is at that point in time, the furthest from its optimum level. For example, at night the limiting factor is likely to be the light intensity as this will be the furthest from its optimum level. During the day, the limiting factor is likely to switch to the temperature or the carbon dioxide concentration as the light intensity increases.

Plants convert light energy to chemical energy through photosynthesis

Photophosphorylation is the production of ATP using the energy of sunlight. Photophosphorylation is made possible as a result of chemiosmosis. Chemiosmosis is the movement of ions across a selectively permeable membrane, down their concentration gradient. During photosynthesis, light is absorbed by chlorophyll molecules. Electrons within these molecules are then raised to a higher energy state. These electrons then travel through Photosystem II, a chain of electron carriers and Photosystem I. As the electrons travel through the chain of electron carriers, they release energy. This energy is used to pump hydrogen ions across the thylakoid membrane and into the space within the thylakoid. A concentration gradient of hydrogen ions forms within this space. These then move back across the thylakoid membrane, down their concentration gradient through ATP synthase. ATP synthase uses the energy released from the movement of hydrogen ions down their concentration gradient to synthesise ATP from ADP and inorganic phosphate.

chemosynthesis and photosynthesis venn diagram

For photosynthesis to occur, plants need: · Light energy from the sun · Chlorophyll to absorb light energy · Carbon dioxide from the atmosphere and from respiration in plant cells · Water which is absorbed by the roots and transported to the leaves by the xylem tubes....