The following eligibility criteria apply to this scholarship:

This scholarship is being funded by the commemorative John Bicknell Scholarship.

The following eligibility criteria apply to this scholarship:

The PhD applicant will collect petrophysical information and palaeomagnetic measurements and utilise these new data in conjunction with the existing geological and geophysical datasets to undertake constrained forward and inverse modelling. These models will be used to better constrain the subsurface geometry of important rock units and hence to evaluate the validity of alternative tectonic models. Understanding the distribution and geometry of mineralised volcano-sedimentary packages will be a major focus of this work.

The following eligibility criteria apply to this scholarship:

Lithocaps have been recognised for over 20 years, but there remains little understanding of the details of their associated alteration and of the processes that produce them. In the southwest of the Republic of Korea a thick lithocap is exposed in quarries that extracted alunite and clay minerals, giving extensive total exposure of the lithocap and the details of its contacts with wallrocks. This project will make use of this unique exposure to determine in detail the vertical variations in mineralogy, chemistry and isotopic signatures of the lithocap, and will use detailed study of the contacts between lithocap alteration and wallrocks to determine the processes by which lithocap alteration occurs, resulting in total modification of the texture, mineralogy and chemistry of the affected wallrocks. This understanding has important implications for how we use lithocaps to help locate major economic orebodies that are spatially and genetically related to them.

There are a number of alternative tectonic models for the development of the Early Paleozoic geology of south eastern Australia including the recent “Orocline” model proposed by Cayley et al. (2012). Outcrop of important rock units is patchy but high quality, public domain geophysical datasets provide an opportunity to test competing models.


The following eligibility criteria apply to this scholarship:

This scholarship provides $32,304pa (2017 rate) living allowance for 3 years, with a possible 6 month extension. Operational funds to support the PhD research project will be provided through the Transforming the Mining Value Chain (TMVC) ARC Industrial Transformation Research Hub.

The following eligibility criteria apply to this scholarship:

This research will focus on the King River delta/Macquarie Harbour, Western Tasmania. Tailings are sourced from the Mt. Lyell Copper mine, Queenstown. Approximately 100 Mt of mine tailings and slag materials were discharged into the Queen and King Rivers since the 1890s, with the 2.5 km2 King River delta built from approximately 10 Mt of mine tailings. This delta is contaminated with Cu, Pb, and Zn. Whilst the tailings properties and the geochemistry of Macquarie Harbour have been documented in previous studies (e.g., Taylor et al., 1997; Eriksen et al., 2001; Augistinus et al., 2010), the sulphide chemistry has yet to be detailed at the micro-scale. Considering this, this research is focussed on resolving:

The following eligibility criteria apply to this scholarship:

This scholarship provides $26,288pa (2016 rate) living allowance for 3 years, with a possible 6 month extension. Operational funds to support the PhD research project will be provided through the Transforming the Mining Value Chain (TMVC) ARC Industrial Transformation Research Hub.

The following eligibility criteria apply to this scholarship:

This PhD project will focus on advancing the geological understanding of a porphyry-style deposit with particular emphasis on the complex alteration overprinting relationships found within the transitional zone (potassic-to-phyllic). The current porphyry model fails to adequately resolve the various types of ‘sericite’ that may be encountered in transitional zones during exploration — which may be grade additive or destructive. These sericite overprints may host high grade ore, but also pose significant challenges to porphyry exploration and exploitation. During this project, detailed characterisation will inform predictive models of processing response and develop workflows which use automated hyperspectral data and multi-element geochemistry to resolve overprinting alteration styles. Key project outcomes will include:

The following eligibility criteria apply to this scholarship:

This project is aimed to develop a three-dimensional hybrid continuous-discontinuous method for studying dynamic fracture of rock under impact and cyclic loads and arching behaviour of resultant irregular-shaped deformable and further breakable fragments. The project will address: 1) how can the transition of rock from continua to discontinua during fracture be modelled? 2) How can the hybrid method be accelerated using heterogeneous CPU and GPU parallel computing technique for large-scale real time modelling? 3) How can the hybrid method to consider dependence of rock strength on loading rates and how can heterogeneity be implemented to simulate rock fracture progressive process? 4) How can the hybrid method be calibrated against well-known dynamic/cyclic rock fracture experiments? 5) How can the hybrid method be applied to model rock fragmentations in rock boring & blast and rock mass instability in surface and underground excavations. The outcome of this project will improve the rock mass excavation / fragmentation efficiency in rock cutting, drilling, crushing and blasting, and improve the rock mass stability in surface and underground excavation in mining, tunnelling and civil engineering. This project will improve our access to natural resources, especially deep or offshore natural resources, and safeguard our existing and new infrastructures.