Plant Energy Transformations-Photosynthesis

Plants vary greatly in size, shape, and the type of environment in which they live.

NOVA - Official Website | Illuminating Photosynthesis

The drawback to C4 photosynthesis is the extra energy in the form of that is used to pump the 4-carbon acids to the bundle sheath cell and the pumping of the 3-carbon compound back to the mesophyll cell for conversion to PEP. This loss to the system is why C3 plants will outperform C4 plants if there is a lot of water and sun. The C4 plants make some of that energy back in the fact that the rubisco is optimally used and the plant has to spend less energy synthesizing rubisco.

The chloroplasts in modern plants are the descendants of these ancient symbiotic cyanobacteria.

There are about 300 thousand known species of plants

Through the process of photosynthesis, sun light is absorbed by plants and converted into chemical energy. Using that chemical energy, the plants are then able to absorb carbon dioxide from the atmosphere and turn it into food for themselves. A beneficial byproduct of that food production is oxygen, which humans need in order to breathe. Photosynthesis will occur in plants, algaes, and different species of bacteria, and organisms that can perform photosynthesis are referred to as photoautotrophs, meaning they can create their own food. Photosynthesis is vital to life on Earth as it helps maintain normal levels of oxygen in the air which is necessary for survival of most species.

Leaves are the food making factories of green plants. Leaves come in many different shapes and sizes. Leaves can be . They are made of a single leaf blade connected by a to the stem. An oak leaf or a maple leaf are examples. A leaf is a leaf made up of separate leaflets attached by a petiole to the stem like an ash or a locust.


Plant Structure & Function - University of Waikato

In leafy plants, the process of photosynthesis occurs largely in the leaves. Because of this, all the necessary ingredients need to be present in the leaves for the reaction to take place. Carbon dioxide is absorbed into the leaves from the air, water is routed from the roots to the leaves, and sunlight is absorbed into the leaves through chlorophyll. Chlorophyll is a green pigment inside plant cells called chloroplasts - which also have several other structures within them. Chloroplasts are important because they are where photosynthesis takes place.

What are the Products of Photosynthesis ? - BiologyWise

Photosynthesis and all associated reactions take place at the molecular level. These microscopic reactions involve several molecules aside from chlorophyll. Some of the other molecules are water (H2O), carbon dioxide (CO2), oxygen (O2), and glucose (C6H12O6). All of the components are necessary and the absence of any one of them causes the entire process to fail. For example, if there is no water available to the plant roots, they will begin to turn brown and die, effectively stopping photosynthesis. Oxygen and glucose are not used in photosynthesis, but are byproducts of the reaction. Oxygen is released into the air, and glucose is stored inside the plant cells.

Basic products of photosynthesis - Encyclopedia …


- the angle between the upper side of the stem and a leaf, branch, or petiole.
- a bud that develops in the axil.
- the reproductive unit of .
- the structure that supports the .
- the area of the stem between any two adjacent nodes.
- an offshoot of the stem of a plant.
- an outgrowth of a plant that grows from a node in the stem.

Chloroplasts carry out photosynthesis for plant ..

The problem of photorespiration is overcome in by a two-stage strategy that keeps CO2 high and oxygen low in the chloroplast where the Calvin cycle operates. The class of plants called and the also have better strategies than C3 plants for the avoidance of photorespiration.

The cell wall is the outer boundary of a plant cell

Most leaves are flat and contain ; their main function is to convert energy from sunlight into chemical energy (food) through photosynthesis.
- the part of the stem of a plant from which a leaf, branch, or aerial root grows; each plant has many nodes.