2.Department of History the University of Queensland.

Rawls, J. (1999) A theory of justice, revised ed. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

70 April 1978.University of Melbourne.

Studies of trade and exchange are fundamental to our past, as cultures in contact result in new imaginings of self, communities, and place in the world. This course engages in archaeological and anthropological discussions about the interconnectedness that results from trade. This seminar concentrates on the discourse of material trade and the mechanisms for exchange, redistribution, dependency and resistance. It also examines the immaterial exchange of ideas, perceptions and values that alter concepts of identity, space and time. Globalization, political economies, and power are also addressed, along with ideas about territory, value, and social and political consequences of trade.

Rattlesnake's Australia - New Guinea Cruise 1846 to 1850.Oxford University Press.

The Annual Reports.Australian National University Press.

We undertake zooarchaeological study of equid skeletons in the zooarchaeology laboratory at Washington University, and in collaboration with the Saint Louis Zoo, participate in a behavioral study of the courtship and breeding behavior of the ancestor of the domestic donkey — the African wild ass. The research questions that we focus on are how the biology and behavior of the African wild ass influenced the domestication of the donkey by prehistoric African herders or ancient Egyptians and how the behavior of the African wild ass continues to affect prospects for conservation of this highly endangered animal. During the first half of the semester, we meet once a week for 2.5 hours in the zooarchaeology laboratory. In the second half of the semester, we no longer meet in the lab, and each student spends two mornings of their choice per week at the Saint Louis Zoo conducting observations of the wild ass. Students may choose two days that fit their schedule. Saturdays and Sundays are included as choices of days. Permission of instructor is required.

The Bougainville Copper Agreement and the Creation of the Panguna Mine.Melbourne University Press.

The course, grounded in a multidisciplinary approach, provides an introduction to the study of migration, featuring significant mass movements in the past 150 years and crucial concepts of historical and theoretical analyses of the movement of people. Course units explore continuities, trends and shifts in human migration and migration policy and how they affect individual immigrants' lives. A variety of sources, such as oral history, films, novels, legal documents and scholarly secondary analysis help students to consider different perspectives on internal and international migrations, from the individual migrant to civil society, from political regulation to economic consideration. Throughout the course, students deepen their understanding of migration as a result of social transformation, force or individual choice. We study concepts of the nation-state and citizenship, the political economy of migration, gender, sexuality and migration, and notions of identity and social inclusion more generally to build a sound critique of contemporary discourses on immigration.
Same as L97 IAS 260

A Comparative Study of New Guinea Societies.Australian National University Press.


Format for Theses | Oxford Law Faculty - University of Oxford

Ken Buckley was associate Professor of Economic History at the University of Sydney and Kris Klugman a graduate of Macquarie University with a MA in Community Studies.

B5-19 Format of the thesis - Oxford Brookes University

This course centers on the burgeoning corpus of anthropological scholarship on reproduction, with special attention to the regulation of reproductive behaviors and population management in cross-cultural perspective. Anthropologists and feminist scholars have shown how reproduction — which links individual bodies to the body politic — is a privileged site for processes of governance. Scholars have also shown how seemingly personal reproductive choices made in the micro units of families are always bound up with broader, if obscured, economic, national and political projects. In this course, we will cover how diverse entities, including the state, the Church, NGOs and feminist groups, seek to manage reproductive behaviors and politics across the world. We will discuss population control campaigns (such as China's notorious one-child policy) and pronatalist population policies (like those seen in Israel) in order to underscore how the management of fertility becomes a crucial site for nationalist and state-building projects. In this course we examine processes of "reproductive governance" around topics including pregnancy and birth, family planning, abortion and adoption. We also examine how the global proliferation of Assisted Reproductive Technologies (such as in vitro, sonogram, abortifacient pills, amniocentesis) intersects with efforts to govern reproduction. Crucially, we take class and race as key axes through which reproduction is experienced and stratified in diverse contexts. At the end of this course students should have a solid grasp of key topics and themes in the anthropology of reproductive governance, as well as more in-depth knowledge of a particular controversial reproductive issue that they choose to focus on for their final research paper.

Submission of Thesis - University of Oxford

120; one fold-out map Government station to Mt Yule, map of Kiwai Island, schematic plan of competing land claims at Vanamai village by the Sacred Heart Mission and the London Missionary Society; rebound in hardcover with gilt titles on cover and spine; title page missing, 2 pages with corner text missing, 5 pages repaired, pages machine numbered in upper right hand corner in addition to government printers page numbers, o/wise in fine condition.

Nuffield Department of Medicine, University of Oxford

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A Thesis presented to the Faculty of the Department of History University of Southern California in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the Degree of Master of Arts.
Author.