New Deal or "Raw Deal": African Americans and the …

But beginning with the Second New Deal in the middle 1930s the criticism turned to applause.

New deal or "raw deal" African Americans and the …

As the first incarnation of the New Deal progressed, African Americans continued to experience prejudice, segregation, unfair wages, and generally a "raw deal." But what was more, African-American women and men were not given a fair opportunity to ensure for themselves better political, social, and economic standing in the future.

Deal or No Deal features three progressive jackpot levels. These are Safe 1, Safe 2 and Safe 3.

New deal or raw deal?: dilemmas and paradoxes of …

The prevailing view among the African American leadership in 1935, argued Harvard Sitkoff, was that the federal government had "betrayed [African Americans] under the New Deal." Sitkoff referred to these "denunciations of the New Deal by blacks" as commonplace from 1933 to 1935.

Therefore, there is a great dealof uncertainty inherent to non-geostatistical estimating methods.

Shortly after taking office, Roosevelt explained to the American people that his New Deal program would seek to deliver relief, recovery, and reform—the so-called "3 Rs."

In the initial period of the New Deal we can see how Roosevelt met and failed to meet the expectations of African Americans.


: How FDR's Economic Legacy Has Damaged America is $0.01

In his Introduction Howard Zinn defines the boundaries of the New Deal's experimentalism and attempts to explain why it sputtered out. The result is a book that captures the spirit of the New Deal—hopeful, pragmatic, humane—yet remains hardheaded about its accomplishments and failures.
—from the Foreword

Steve Forbes Comments on New Deal or Raw Deal?

As the first incarnation of the New Deal progressed, African Americans continued to experience prejudice, segregation, unfair wages, and generally a “raw deal.” But what was more, African-American women and men were not given a fair opportunity to ensure for themselves better political, social, and economic standing in the future.

The Raw Deal Archives - WPRB History

"The volume is primarily a collection of documents and . . . remains a vaulable resource. Containing 420 pages of documentation, it is divided into eleven sections . . . national economic planning, monopoly power and public enterprise, social welfare, and the interest groups which the New Deal failed to mobilize."
—Stuart Kidd,

New Deal Thought - Political Theory

Introduction.
Chronology.
Selected Bibliography.

PART ONE: Philosophic Setting

1. Charles A. Beard: The Myth of Rugged American Individualism (1931)
2. Upton Sinclair: Production for Use (1933)
3. Reinhold Niebuhr: After Capitalism – What? (1933)
4. Stuart Chase: The Age of Distribution (1934)
5. John Dewey: The Future of Liberalism (1935)
6. Thurman Arnold: A Philosophy for Politicians (1935)

PART TWO: Expectations

7. Franklin D. Roosevelt: Every Man Has a Right to Life (1932)
8. Paul H. Douglas: The Roosevelt Program and Organization of the Weak (1933)
9. Robert M. McIver: The Ambiguity of the New Deal (1934)
10. Edward A. Filene: Business Needs the New Deal (1934)
11. Henry A. Wallace: We Need a Declaration of Interdependence (1936)

PART THREE: National Economic Planning

12. Franklin D. Roosevelt: Bold, Persistent Experimentation (1932)
13. Rexford Guy Tugwell: Planning Must Replace Laissez Faire (1932)
14. Gerard Swope: A Business Approach to Economic Planning (1934)
15. Walter Lippmann: Planning Will Lead to Oligarchy (1937)
16. David A. Lilienthal: Planning Step by Step (1944)

PART FOUR: Giantism in Business

17. Ernest Gruening: Controlling the Giant Corporation (1933)
18. William O. Douglas: How Effective is Securities Regulation (1934)
19. Franklin D. Roosevelt: Stop Collectivism in Business (1938)
20. Thurman Arnold: The Rule of Reason in Antitrust Action (1939)
21. Raymond Moley: Roosevelt's Refusal to Make a Choice (1939)
22. Temporary National Economic Committee: The Concentration on Economic Power (1941)

PART FIVE: Public Enterprise

23. Harry L. Hopkins: The War on Distress (1933)
24. Nathan Straus: End the Slums (1938)
25. Lewis Mumford: The Government Should Support Art (1936)
26. Hallie Flanagan: The Drama of the Federal Theater Project (1939)
27. Max Lerner: A TVA "Yardstick" for the Option Industries (1939)
28. Alvin Hansen: The Need for Long-Range Public Investment (1939)

PART SIX: Organizing Labor

29. The Wagner Act: Unions of Their Own Choosing (1935)
30. Heywood Broun: Why Exclude Domestic Workers? (1935)
31. John L. Lewis: Industrial Democracy in Steel (1936)
32. Liberals Disagree on the Sit-down Strike (1937)
Robert Morss Lovett: A G.M. Stockholder Visits Flint
Oswald Garrison Villard: A Letter F.D.R. Ought to Write
33. Philip Murray: How the NLRB Changed "Little Siberia"(1939)

PART SEVEN: The Farmer

34. Fiorello La Guardia: Urban Support for the Farmer (1933)
35. Henry A. Wallace: A Defense of the New Deal Farm Program (1938)
36. William R. Amberson: Damn the Whole Tenant System (1935)
37. John Steinbeck: The Torment of Migrant Workers in California (1936)
38. Carey McWilliams: Farm Workers and "Dirt Farmers" need Power (1942)

PART EIGHT: Minimum Security

39. Hugo Black: For a Thirty-Hour Work Week (1933)
40. Stuart Chase: The Consumer Must be Permitted to Consume (1933)
41. Frances Perkins: The Principles of Social Security (1935)
42. Henry Ellenbogen: The Social Security Act is Only a Beginning (1935)
43. Franklin D. Roosevelt: A Fair Day's Pay for a Fair Day's Work (1937)
44. Samuel Lubell and Walter Everett: The Breakdown of Relief (1938)
45. Henry E. Sigerist: Government Should Also Protect "The Right to Health" (1938)

PART NINE: The Negro

46. Guy B. Johnson: Does the South Owe the Negro a New Deal? (1934)
47. John P. Davis: The New Deal: Slogans for the Same Raw Deal (1935)
48. Robert C. Weaver: The New Deal is for the Negro 49. Walter White: U.S. Department of (White) Justice (1935)
50. Harold L. Ickes: Not "Special Consideration" But a "New Social Order for All" (1936)
51. W. E. B. DuBois: Can Federal Action Change the South? (1940)

PART TEN: The Constitution and Social Progress

52. Felix Frankfurter: Social Issues Before the Supreme Court (1933)
53. Morris R. Cohen: Fallacies About the Court (1935)
54. Franklin D. Roosevelt: The Court Needs "New and Younger Blood" (1937)
55. The Supreme Court Retreats: Minimum-Wage Laws are Constitutional (1937)

PART ELEVEN: Critiques and Perspectives

56. Frances Perkins: FDR Was "A Little Left of Center" (1946)
57. Benjamin Stolberg and Warren Jay Vinton: The New Deal "Moves in Every Direction at Once" (1935)
58. Floyd B. Olson: A New Party to Challenge Capitalism (1935)
59. Norman Thomas: Socialism, Not Roosevelt's Pale Pink Pills (1936)
60. John Maynard Keynes: The Maintenance of Prosperity is Extremely Difficult (1938)
61. John Dewey: The Old Problems are Unsolved (1939)
62. The New Republic: "Extraordinary Accomplishments" and "Failure in the Central Problem" (1940)

Index.