Flame Synthesis of Valuable Nanoparticles: Recent …

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Flame synthesis of Ni-catalyzed nanofibers - ScienceDirect

AB - Rare-earth doped yttria upconversion nanophosphors were synthesized using a single-step gas-phase flame synthesis method. The phosphors were characterized by x-ray diffractometry, transmission electron microscopy, and fluorescence spectroscopy. The dependence of multiphoton emissions on excitation power was examined. The results show that particle size, morphology, and photoluminescence intensity are strongly affected by flame temperature. The as-prepared nanophosphors are mostly single crystallites with an average size less than 30 nm. Under laser diode excitation, bright blue, green, and red emissions are visible from these phosphors which show potential applications in biological imaging and photodynamic therapy.

T1 - Flame synthesis and characterization of rare-earth (Er3+, Ho3+, and Tm3+) doped upconversion nanophosphors

Flame synthesis of Ni-catalyzed nanofibers is illustrated

Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) offer a promising alternative energy technology, but suffer from low power densities which hinder their practical applicability. In order to improve anodic power density, we deposited carbon nanostructures (CNSs) on an otherwise plain stainless steel mesh (SS-M) anode. Using a flame synthesis method that did not require pretreatment of SS-M substrates, we were able to produce these novel CNS-enhanced SS-M (CNS-M) anodes quickly (in a matter of minutes) and inexpensively, without the added costs of chemical pretreatments. During fed batch experiments with biomass from anaerobic digesters in single-chamber MFCs, the median power densities (based on the projected anodic surface area) were 2.9 mW m-2 and 187 mW m -2 for MFCs with SS-M and CNS-M anodes, respectively. The addition of CNSs to a plain SS-M anode via flame deposition therefore resulted in a 60-fold increase in the median power production. The combination of CNSs and metallic current collectors holds considerable promise for power production in MFCs.

11-20-Flame Synthesis of Supported Platinum Group Metals for Catalysis and Sensorspmr-jan09 will be available on

Rare-earth doped yttria upconversion nanophosphors were synthesized using a single-step gas-phase flame synthesis method. The phosphors were characterized by x-ray diffractometry, transmission electron microscopy, and fluorescence spectroscopy. The dependence of multiphoton emissions on excitation power was examined. The results show that particle size, morphology, and photoluminescence intensity are strongly affected by flame temperature. The as-prepared nanophosphors are mostly single crystallites with an average size less than 30 nm. Under laser diode excitation, bright blue, green, and red emissions are visible from these phosphors which show potential applications in biological imaging and photodynamic therapy.

Rapid flame synthesis of multilayer graphene on …


"Flame synthesis of carbon nanotubes" by Jorge …

AB - For several years, we have been developing a process--called Chemical Vapor Condensation (CVC)--for the high rate production of nanophase ceramic powders. This method proved to be well-suited to the synthesis of non-oxide ceramics, such as SiC and Si3N4. More recently, we have been investigating the synthesis of oxide ceramics by a similar process, except for the replacement of the original hot-wall reactor with a combustion-flame reactor. A specially designed burner is used to achieve a flat flame, extending a few millimeters out of the burner, which ensures that the temperature distribution and gas phase residence time are identical over the entire burner surface. Metalorganic precursors, introduced along with the fuel/air mixture, therefore experience completely uniform decomposition and reaction, thereby yielding an uniform nanopowder product. In this talk, we will describe the progress made in flame synthesis of SiO2, TiO2, and Al2O3 nanopowders.

Flame Synthesis of Nanoparticles | | University of Stuttgart

For several years, we have been developing a process--called Chemical Vapor Condensation (CVC)--for the high rate production of nanophase ceramic powders. This method proved to be well-suited to the synthesis of non-oxide ceramics, such as SiC and Si3N4. More recently, we have been investigating the synthesis of oxide ceramics by a similar process, except for the replacement of the original hot-wall reactor with a combustion-flame reactor. A specially designed burner is used to achieve a flat flame, extending a few millimeters out of the burner, which ensures that the temperature distribution and gas phase residence time are identical over the entire burner surface. Metalorganic precursors, introduced along with the fuel/air mixture, therefore experience completely uniform decomposition and reaction, thereby yielding an uniform nanopowder product. In this talk, we will describe the progress made in flame synthesis of SiO2, TiO2, and Al2O3 nanopowders.

Flame Synthesis of Nanoparticles

AB - Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) offer a promising alternative energy technology, but suffer from low power densities which hinder their practical applicability. In order to improve anodic power density, we deposited carbon nanostructures (CNSs) on an otherwise plain stainless steel mesh (SS-M) anode. Using a flame synthesis method that did not require pretreatment of SS-M substrates, we were able to produce these novel CNS-enhanced SS-M (CNS-M) anodes quickly (in a matter of minutes) and inexpensively, without the added costs of chemical pretreatments. During fed batch experiments with biomass from anaerobic digesters in single-chamber MFCs, the median power densities (based on the projected anodic surface area) were 2.9 mW m-2 and 187 mW m -2 for MFCs with SS-M and CNS-M anodes, respectively. The addition of CNSs to a plain SS-M anode via flame deposition therefore resulted in a 60-fold increase in the median power production. The combination of CNSs and metallic current collectors holds considerable promise for power production in MFCs.