De Broglie hypothesis says that all matter has both particle and ..

In general, the De Broglie hypothesis is expected to apply to any well isolated object.

using the data as confirmation of the de Broglie hypothesis

This was a pivotal result in the development of quantummechanics. Just as Arthur Compton demonstrated the particle natureof light, the Davisson-Germer experiment showed the wave-nature ofmatter, and completed the theory of wave-particle duality. Forphysicists this idea was important because it means that not onlycan any particle exhibit wave characteristics, but that one can usewave equations to describe phenomena in matter if one uses the deBroglie wavelength.

In general, the De Broglie hypothesis is expected to apply toany well isolated objects. it was a very long process

The hypothesis was advanced by Louis de Broglie in 1924 in his ..

For this he received several scholarships from the university of Chicago
Electrons diffract just like waves when shot at a nickel crystal structure!
De Broglie purposed an equation (see bellow) to calculate the wave length of an electron.
Their observations of diffraction allowed for the first measurements of the wavelength of electrons
The experiment was performed in the bell laboratory
Louis de Broglie was correct!

Clinton Davisson - Biographical.

Since the original Davisson-Germer experiment for electrons, thede Broglie hypothesis has been confirmed for other elementaryparticles.

On a break, Davisson attended the Oxford meeting of the British Association for the Advancement of Science in summer 1926. At this meeting, he learned of the recent advances in quantum mechanics. To Davisson's surprise, Max Born gave a lecture that used diffraction curves from Davisson's 1923 research which he had published in that year, using the data as confirmation of the de Broglie hypothesis.

The Davisson–Germer experiment confirmed the de Broglie hypothesis that matter has ..


de Broglie introduced the daring hypothesis that the ..

In 1927 at , Clinton Davisson and Lester Germer fired slow moving electrons at a crystalline nickel target. The angular dependence of the reflected electron intensity was measured and was determined to have the same diffraction pattern as those predicted by Bragg for X-rays. At the same time independently demonstrated the same effect firing electrons through metal films to produce a diffraction pattern, and Davisson and Thomson shared the Nobel Prize in Physics in 1937. The Davisson–Germer experiment confirmed the de Broglie hypothesis that matter has wave-like behavior. This, in combination with the discovered by (who won the Nobel Prize for Physics in 1927), established the wave–particle duality hypothesis which was a fundamental step in quantum theory.

after the 1927's experimental confirmation of de Broglie ..

This effect has been used to demonstrate atomic , and it may allow the construction of an atom probe imaging system with nanometer resolution. The description of these phenomena is based on the wave properties of neutral atoms, confirming the de Broglie hypothesis.

after the 1927's experimental confirmation of de Broglie hypothesis.

Louis de Broglie (1892-1987) tried to expand on Bohr's ideas,and he pushed for their application beyond hydrogen. In fact helooked for an equation which could explain the wavelengthcharacteristics of all matter. His equation was not provedexperimentally until a few years later. Nevertheless, hishypothesis would hold true for both electrons and for everydayobjects. In de Broglie's equation an electron's wavelength will bea function of Planck's constant (joule-seconds) divided by the object's momentum(nonrelativistically, its mass multiplied by its velocity). Whenthis momentum is very large (relative to Planck's constant), thenan object's wavelength is very small. This is the case withevery-day objects, such as a person. Given the enormous momentum ofa person compared with the very tiny Planck constant, thewavelength of a person would be so small (on the order of meters or smaller) as tobe undetectable by any current measurement tools. On the otherhand, many small particles (such as typical electrons in everydaymaterials) have a very low momentum compared to macroscopicobjects. In this case, the de Broglie wavelength may be largeenough that the particle's wave-like nature gives observableeffects.

as confirmation of the de Broglie hypothesis

In 1927 at Bell Labs, Clinton Davisson and Lester Germer firedslow-moving electrons at a crystalline nickel target. The angulardependence of the reflected electron intensity was measured, andwas determined to have the same diffraction pattern as thosepredicted by Bragg for X-Rays. Before the acceptance of the deBroglie hypothesis, diffraction was a property that was thought tobe only exhibited by waves. Therefore, the presence of anydiffraction effects by matter demonstrated the wave-like nature ofmatter. When the de Broglie wavelength was inserted into the Braggcondition, the observed diffraction pattern was predicted, therebyexperimentally confirming the de Broglie hypothesis forelectrons.