Pain after amputation | BJA Education | Oxford Academic

01/02/2004 · Pain after amputation ..

with a prior lower limb amputation

During his third week in hospital, Stephen experienced an episode of pain in his phantom leg – although ‘pain’ turns out to be a wholly inadequate word for what he describes: excruciatingly clenched toes, jolts that he likens to being shocked by a cattle prod, writhing so violent that his head was banging against the metal sides of the hospital bed. Stephen was left in tears after the bout.

Amputation, Prosthesis Use, and Phantom Limb Pain : …

In his book Phantoms in the Brain, the neuroscientist VS Ramachandran describes a woman born without arms who reported having phantom hands, which she used to gesticulate when she spoke. Other parts of the body have been known to come in phantom versions too: women who have undergone mastectomies report phantom breasts; people whose bladders have been removed still feel the strong urge to go; men who have undergone penectomies report phantom erections. One night, years after his leg was gone, Stephen woke up at 4am, swung his phantom leg off the bed, and crashed to the floor on his stump, necessitating a bloody trip to hospital. Even today, ten years after his amputation, he can feel a sore he had on his heel from a cycling shoe.

Just as the pain of war lingers long after it is over, so an amputee can still feel pain in parts of a limb no longer attached to their body; a foot or a hand that they no longer own. It can be harrowing and difficult to treat with medication or surgery. Stephen helps people deal with their phantom pain, and he does it with mirrors.


Amputation, prosthesis use, and phantom limb pain : …

Abstract — This study identified clinical (e.g., etiology) and demographic factors related to prosthesis use in persons with upper- and lower-limb amputation (ULA and LLA, respectively) and the effect of phantom limb pain (PLP) and residual limb pain (RLP) on prosthesis use. A total of 752 respondents with LLA and 107 respondents with ULA completed surveys. Factors related to greater use (hours per day) for persons with LLA included younger age, full- or part-time employment, marriage, a distal amputation, an amputation of traumatic etiology, and an absence of PLP. Less use was associated with reports that prosthesis use worsened RLP, and greater prosthesis use was associated with reports that prosthesis use did not affect PLP. Having a proximal amputation and reporting lower average PLP were related to greater use in hours per day for persons with an ULA, while having a distal amputation and being married were associated with greater use in days per month. Finally, participants with LLA were significantly more likely to wear a prosthesis than those with ULA. These results underscore the importance of examining factors related to prosthesis use and the differential effect that these variables may have when the etiology and location of amputation are considered.

Amputation, Prosthesis Use, and Phantom Limb Pain - …

In comparing those with ULA versus LLA, we noticed a number of important differences. Most notably, participants with LLA were significantly more likely to wear a prosthesis and to wear a prosthesis for a greater number of hours per day than were persons with ULA. Further, demographic and medical predictors of prosthesis use varied by amputation site (i.e., upper or lower limb). In particular, factors related to greater use (in hours per day) in persons with LLA included being younger, being employed, being married, having a distal amputation, and having an amputation of traumatic etiology. By contrast, level of amputation was the only variable associated with prosthesis use for persons with ULA. Specifically, those with a distal amputation wore their prostheses for significantly more days per month than those with a proximal amputation.

Amputation, Prosthesis Use, and Phantom Limb Pain | …

Abstract — This study identified clinical (e.g., etiology) and demographic factors related to prosthesis use in persons with upper- and lower-limb amputation (ULA and LLA, respectively) and the effect of phantom limb pain (PLP) and residual limb pain (RLP) on prosthesis use. A total of 752 respondents with LLA and 107 respondents with ULA completed surveys. Factors related to greater use (hours per day) for persons with LLA included younger age, full- or part-time employment, marriage, a distal amputation, an amputation of traumatic etiology, and an absence of PLP. Less use was associated with reports that prosthesis use worsened RLP, and greater prosthesis use was associated with reports that prosthesis use did not affect PLP. Having a proximal amputation and reporting lower average PLP were related to greater use in hours per day for persons with an ULA, while having a distal amputation and being married were associated with greater use in days per month. Finally, participants with LLA were significantly more likely to wear a prosthesis than those with ULA. These results underscore the importance of examining factors related to prosthesis use and the differential effect that these variables may have when the etiology and location of amputation are considered.